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Will a 40+ Year Old Ceramic Decal Work on Fused Glass? Project Tutorial

Vintage Decal Glass Fusing Project

This 40+ year old ceramic decal has had a hard life. Will it still work, especially on fused glass?

Well, that’s a good question. It has been creased, beaten around, stained and more, but it’s a nice decal and worth trying.

Keep reading for more project information, and a YouTube video of the full tutorial adventure as I fuse up a platter, apply the decal and finally slump it into a nice platter shape.

Project Information

Glass Artists Are Hot

I purchased this at least 5 years ago from a local charity outlet. It cost a grand total of $2. For that, I thought, it’s worth trying. Then I forgot about it until recently. Time to try it!

The decal is by a company called Cerami Center Inc. I spent some time on the net trying to find out some information on this company, but all I could find is one place selling a few of the decals and a couple of others selling the decal catalogues. But nothing specific about the company.

These are ceramic decals so intended for placing on ceramics, but I know they are also compatible with glass. I’ve used ceramic decals many times.

Anyway, watch the video and then come back here for some more information below.

YouTube Video

Vintage Decal Fused Glass Project

Extra Notes

So, I hope you enjoyed the video and it answered most of your questions. Just a few other things.

It is important to be aware that these older decals are not food safe, as noted on the product package. Don’t use these on anything that will come in contact with food. No exceptions.

Just before applying a decal I find adding some water to the piece helps keep it loose and easily positioned. I know some feel that extra water can be a problem, but I’ve never found that. Just make sure to leave it to dry completely.

When applying the decal I had a little problem with the creases. Not all were removed, but I tried to make sure any that crossed the actual coloured areas were as flat as possible. The spatula I used is very soft. I don’t recommend a stiff spatula as they tend to be too hard and can tear the decal. Keep it as flat as possible and work gently. Better to tease those bubbles and creases out than try to do it in one swipe.

I used a rolled-up tea towel to finish removing excess water. It works a treat, but don’t wipe. Place it on the decal gently and roll it, rather than wipe it.

When the decal is completely dry make sure to clean the areas around the decal. You will probably notice smears from the decal paper that includes glue so be sure to remove them completely.

When firing the decal on, be sure to vent your kiln during the first segment up to 535 C. When the decal medium burns off it will make smoke and usually quite a smell. So ventilate your work area as well. If possible stay out of the area or wear a mask. Close the vent once the temperature is reached.

If you do have any information on Cerami Center Inc, or just have a question, please make a comment on the video so other viewers can learn as well.

💥 Full Fuse Firing Schedule

  • #1 – 222 C (432 F) up to 535 C (995 F), hold 60 minutes
  • #2 – 333 C (631 F) up to 810 C (1490 F), hold 10 minutes
  • #3 – Full down to 482 C (900 F), hold 60 minutes
  • #4 – 65 C ( 149 F) down to 425 C (797 F), no hold
  • #5 – 132 C ( 270 F) down to 371 C (700 F), no hold

💥 Decal Firing Schedule

  • #1 – 222 C (432 F) up to 535 C (995 F), hold 60 minutes (vent kiln up to this temp)
  • #2 – 333 C (631 F) up to 670 C (1238 F), no hold
  • #3 – Full up to 750 C (1382 F), hold 10 minutes
  • #4 – Full down to 482 C (900 F), hold 60 minutes
  • #5 – 65 C ( 149 F) down to 425 C (797 F), no hold
  • #6 – 132 C ( 270 F) down to 371 C (700 F), no hold

💥 Slump Firing Schedule

  • #1 – 167 C (333 F) up to 620 C (1148 F), no hold
  • #2 – Full down to 482 C (900 F), hold 60 minutes
  • #3 – 65 C ( 149 F) down to 425 C (797 F), no hold
  • #4 – 132 C ( 270 F) down to 371 C (700 F), no hold
Jeff
Author: Jeff

Jeff's interest range from anything to do with science, the arts, philosophy, writing and much more. He is really a jack-of-all-trades, and probably master of none. However, working with glass and the arts are probably his main passion.

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